Introducing C. Lee McKenzie

Here’s something a little bit different for you today, a middle-grade author! I’ve know C. Lee for a long time through our blogs, so it’s great to have her here today to celebrate the launch of her new book.

If you’ve got kids, check this out. If you know some kids, check it out too. If you don’t know any kids, but love great stories, check it out too 😉 

Take it away, C. Lee…


Hi Annalisa,

It’s great to be here today. Thank you for giving me a chance to talk about this new book.When you offered to lend a hand, you mentioned that your readers weren’t likely to be my audience for this one since it’s written for the middle-grade reader. So I thought I’d tell about the night a bookseller gave a presentation to a group of rather senior citizens and brought picture books along with others for her talk.

She began with a story about an overheard conversation in her bookstore. It was a father telling his daughter to put that picture book away; she was older now and should be reading more advanced books. Then the bookseller, held up a picture book and began to read aloud. I admit, she was a great reader, and I along with the rest of the audience, fell into the story. When she came to almost the end, she said, “Well, you get the idea,” and closed the book. There was a collective “No!” that came from the entire audience. We wanted to hear what happened to that goose!

She’d made her point. If it’s a good story, it will capture and hold your imagination no matter what age it was intended for.

I write primarily in two categories of fiction: Young Adult and Middle Grade. While the booksellers put these on shelves designated for those age groups, my readers are often a lot older. One reviewer who has become a fan of my Young Adult (thank you ever so much) admits to being a sixty-year-old male. He has read and reviewed all of those books. My Middle Grade also has a middle aged audience. They tell me they pick up these little fantasies for a quick, fun escape from their real world. Some read them to be sure they’re okay for their children.

For All My Work Click HERE
For a Gift Click HERE

Some Very Messy Medieval Magic is book three in The Adventures of Pete and Weasel. Alligators Overhead was the first in the series, and The Great Timelock Disaster was the second. Instead of my writing the overview, here’s the short trailer that gives you the idea of what happens to these two adventurers.  


All my books are available online. 
 
Some Very Messy Medieval Magic is available at these locations. 
 
AMAZON . B&N . KOBO  . SMASHWORDS . YABC 
Print ISBN 9781939844460 / EBook ISBN 9781939844477

 

Order through Ingram, Follett, or from the publisher

EBook available in all formats 


Thank you again for the time and space on your blog, Annalisa. I loved popping over to your neck of woods for a chat.
 
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Kyra Lennon’s Reasonable Doubts, without doubt!

Huge congratulations to Kyra Lennon, whose new book, Reasonable Doubts, hits the shelves, Kindles and all other ereaders today! I’m so excited to be taking part in the release blitz – don’t you just love it when you see your blogger friends featured all over your favourite blogs!

Blurb: Darcy Ryan is a woman on a mission. A mission to take down the corrupt cops who ensured her best friend, Matteo Torres, went to jail for a crime he didn’t commit – the murder of his wife, Rebecca.

Darcy is willing to do just about anything to prove his innocence, including getting up close and personal with lead detective, Finn Drake.

She knows she’s playing a dangerous game, but it gets more dangerous than she could have ever imagined when she discovers everything she thought she knew about Rebecca Torres was wrong, and Finn Drake isn’t the man she thought he was either.

Darcy’s life and her best friend’s freedom are on the line. With her entire world turned on its head and time running out, she has to decide. Should she take a chance on Drake and go against her gut instincts, or go it alone and pray she can find the killer before he finds her?

Amazon US // Amazon UK // iBooks UK // iBooks US // Kobo // B and N

Stalker Links…

Website: http://www.kyralennon.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kyralennonwrites/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KLennonWrites

My rules for writers

A couple of days ago, I stumbled upon Zadie Smith’s Rules for Writers, and, coupled with a conversation I had on Twitter last night, I thought I’d give my own list a go.

For those of you still new to me, here are my credentials: I’ve been seriously writing for publication since I was about fifteen (which is 27 years and pre-internet!), have received at least 300 rejections, had two major writing breaks, and suffer writers block every time I finish a project.

4-book-web-site-picI’ve also had 12 short stories published in small press journals; 19 short stories long-listed, short-listed and placed 3rd, 2nd or 1st in competitions; and three books published by small/indie publishers and one book self-published.

  1. Don’t aspire be the next [insert best-selling author in your genre], be the first you. By the time you’ve read that author’s latest book, and been inspired to write something similar, the industry has moved on to the next big thing. Don’t you want to lead rather than follow?
  2. Don’t expect your first draft to be perfect. Most books go through at least several drafts before they are published. Mine go through many
  3. Don’t be afraid of rejection. I wrote a post about that…
  4. Read, a lot – in your genre, outside of your genre, non-fiction
  5. Don’t force yourself to write if you don’t feel like it. I’ve read a lot of advice that says you should write every day, but it doesn’t work for me, so I don’t do it
  6. In fact, ignore any advice you don’t think will work for you
  7. Know the rules of good grammar, and then break them, if it works in your story
  8. Know the rules of submission etiquette and stick to them. Agents and editors have a preference, for their ease, on how they want to be approached. Don’t give them a reason to reject you before they’ve even read your manuscript. Janet Reid has a lot of advice. Personally, I learnt from Writing Magazine.
  9. Take regular breaks, preferably outside. You don’t want to look pasty in your promotional material
  10. Don’t give up if things don’t go exactly to plan. Think of plans more as a guideline.

Bonus tip: Enjoy it. If you don’t enjoy writing, if it causes you misery or heartache or depression more than it brings you joy, consider whether it’s really the path you want to take.

 

What would you add to this list?