Farewell, 2020

I’ve written three posts for today – varying themes and tones, not quite settling on what I want to say. In fact, I don’t think I want to say anything – a bizarre state of affairs for a writer! But there are only so many times you can say the same thing.

We’ve all suffered a lot this year – directly and indirectly. We’ve lost people we loved, we haven’t seen people who matter to us, we’ve spent days (or longer) alone, and we learned a lot of grown-ups needed to be told how to wash their hands.

Most of all, we learned we have to mix the joyful with the tragedy because life is unbearable otherwise.

At the very beginning of the UK lockdown in March, once I recovered from my own suspected Covid illness, I made sure I got out for a walk every day. The silence on the roads was eerie – there were no cars, no people, I had the world to myself. I tried to appreciate what I had, because I could feel myself sliding into sadness. I loved seeing the weeds growing from the kerb, and the silence where normally I’d hear the drone of traffic on the busy by-pass. One day, I turned a corner into a street and the air was filled with the most amazing birdsong – I couldn’t see a single creature, but the sound was incredible.

Serendipitously, I was working (still am, in fact) on a novel where a woman wakes up one morning in a deserted town, so I used each of my senses and every observation to pour into my work.

The people in my town have always been friendly, but that escalated this year. Several Facebook groups have sprouted, people continue to offer help to others who are isolating, our fabric facemask industry boomed – handmade ones are in all the local community and gift shops! Even the two-metre rule is adhered to with diligence as we all criss-cross the streets to avoid people coming the other way.

It’s not been the same for everyone, and I realise I am extremely lucky. But if we can get to the end of the year with even just one positive recollection, I think that’s a win.

Stay safe, take care, and hopefully we’ll have a much better 2021 xx

19 thoughts on “Farewell, 2020

  1. Hi Annalisa … yes it’ll be great to see 2020 behind us – with hope ahead in 2021 … it’s been really strange seeing how the streets have changed and the place is so quiet, while birdsong rings out. Love the appropriate photos … take care and am glad you’re writing away as life goes on … as well as getting out for a good walk in the sea air … take care and have a happy 2021 .. Hilary xoxo

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  2. One of the reasons I have been quiet on social media recently is because I feel I have nothing to say of any value. Like you, I count myself lucky in many ways but it certainly hasn’t been an easy year and I am trying to look towards the new year with positivity and hope. Let’s hope it’s a much brighter year for everyone. All good wishes to you and your family Annalisa.

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  3. I never want to hear the word, “unprecendented,” again! We’ve made through – we’ll a day or two more…You are a bright spot for me and many others I’m sure. Here’s to a brilliant new year!

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    1. Couldn’t resist connectin with another Goodwin! In my WIP, my quirky character mishears unprecedented as unpresidented (actually I think that’s how some ministers have pronounce it). Happy New Year!

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  4. This rings so true for me – “I tried to appreciate what I had, because I could feel myself sliding into sadness.” Focusing on gratitude helps me a lot. It doesn’t always make me feel better, but I know I’d feel even worse if I didn’t at least give it a try. 🙂

    All the best to you in 2021!

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  5. Your woman in the deserted town sounds intriguing. Good luck with that!
    Also love the pics, especially the beautiful flowers, which seem to promise hope somehow….

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    1. The flowers were from someone’s garden and weeds on the roadside. We have the nicest weeds around here 🙂 The WIP is challenging, but I got such wonderful memories of 2020 to draw on. Happy New Year x

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